Flax Egg – Heart of a Vegan Vegetarian Baker

You must be thinking, what exactly is a flax egg? A flax egg is a vegan egg substitute, that is made up of ground flax seeds and water. The second question you might have is how to use flax egg? Well, as my title say, flax egg is a heart of a vegan vegetarian baker. So basically, you can use flax eggs in any recipes that calls for real egg.
I have already dedicated post to Egg Substitutes where I mentioned flax as an egg substitute but since I love to use flax so much, I thought of sharing detailed post about it.
Below is the video instructions to prepare flax eggs.


Your next question would be, do flax egg changes the taste? I would say, yes but pleasant flavor not bad flavor and it also gives great binding.
There are two kinds of flax seeds available at my supermarket. Brown and golden flax seeds. And I usually buy Golden Flax meal not the seeds. But if you can’t find the flax meal, buy the flax seeds and grind using dry or coffee grinder and store in a cool dry place or simply refrigerate for longer freshness.

Now, let’s talk about key nutrition of Flax seeds. Flaxseeds are an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids. They are a very good source of dietary fiber, vitamin B1 and and copper. They are also a good source of the minerals magnesium, phosphorus and selenium. So basically if you have been eating eggs and thinking that you will miss out on omega than rest assured as you will be getting better nutrition than eggs.
Ok, so all good stuff about flax. Now, let me come to the recipes. I use Flax to replace egg and egg white as well.
I have been baking/cooking without eggs for years now successfully as my in-laws do not eat eggs. To me personally, love challenging recipes and I am sure many of us find it hard to bake recipes without eggs and I am so thrilled to discover more ways to bake without eggs, for those who are allergic to eggs or don’t consume eggs for many other reasons.
To replace 1 egg, take 1 tbsp Flax powder + 3 tbsp warm water. Stir well, and allow the mixture to set for about 10 minutes. After 10 minutes or so, the result should be a sticky egg-like substitute, with a gelatinous, stretchy texture and ready to use in recipes.
To replace egg white, I actually make Flax Gel. Since it takes time to make gel, I make in bulk and freeze for up to 3 months or refrigerate small portion and use within 3-4 days. I use the same amount of flax gel as egg white in recipes.
Below, you can watch my video to prepare the flax gel.

And you will actually amazed that I also prepare Meringue out of flax gel. See the video below.

The only drawback is that the meringue is not stable like made with egg whites so I add egg replace powder in it to stable and make cookies out it. Yes, you can make many kinds of meringue cookies including French Macarons. My favorite is to make Rainbow Meringue Cookies.
You will simply fall in love with egg free vegan meringue cookies shown below.
 
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How to make Flax Egg
Prep Time
1 min
Total Time
1 min
 
Servings: 1 egg substitute
Recipe Creator: Bhavna
Ingredients
  • 1 Tbsp 7 g flaxseed meal (ground raw flaxseed)
  • 2 1/2- 3 Tbsp 37 ml water
Instructions
  1. Add flaxseed meal and water to a dish and stir. Let rest for 5 minutes to thicken. Add to recipes in place of 1 egg.
Recipe Notes

It's not an exact 1:1 substitution in every recipe because it doesn't bind and stiffen during baking quite like an egg does. But I've found it to work incredibly well in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, muffins, cookies, and many other recipes.

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How to make Flax Gel to use as Egg White & for Beauty
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
20 mins
 
Servings: 1 cup
Recipe Creator: Bhavna
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup Flax Seeds
  • 2 cups of water
Instructions
  1. Boil 1/4 cup Flax Seeds in 2 cups of water. In 15 minutes, it should look gooey and become a thicker viscosity.
  2. Place the stocking inside the container and wrap it around the rim. This will help you strain the seeds.
  3. Pour the mix into the stocking to separate and strain the seeds from the gel.
  4. Store into refrigerator or freeze.

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